Child care has long been a complex and challenging issue for providers, families, and employers alike. Last fall, the Community Foundation for South Central New York, United Way of Broome County, and the Conrad and Virginia Klee Foundation determined that given the serious challenges providers were experiencing, it might be useful to investigate the existence of alternative child care models.

 

Together, we funded the work of a graduate student intern in the Binghamton University MPA program to research such models and develop recommendations for New York’s Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) system.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic underscored the vital role ECEC programs play in supporting the working families that keep our economy running. Through the American Rescue Plan, New York is poised to provide more than $1.8 billion to child care providers, families, and employers to meet ongoing needs. While this historic investment will extend much needed relief, it is also an opportunity for transformative action.

 

The report emphasizes:

Substantial Public Investment is Necessary

Increasing Access to Early Childhood Education and Care is Good for the Economy

Improving the Child Care System Requires a Holistic Approach

 

New York State has the power to rebuild the child care system to better serve individual and economic interests. Making ECEC accessible and affordable, and improving its quality, will transform family earning potential, educational outcomes for children, tax revenue for the state, and overall quality of life. If there was ever a time to build back better, it is now.

 

The full report is available at https://bit.ly/3hYq0vq

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